Monday, August 22, 2016

Cape Cod Rehab’s CCM Training Tip #7: Give It A Rest


There’s just ten weeks to go until the Cape Cod Marathon weekend! I’m sure you’ve been crushing your long runs, giving big efforts on your tempo runs and speed work, but maybe you’re starting to feel some tightness and soreness creeping in at times. What is the first step to preventing this from becoming an injury situation that keeps you from finishing your training and reaching your goals on race day? 

REST!

Why do you want to do this you might ask? Well for one reason, resting is when you get faster! All of your training is a stress to your body, this makes your tired, sore and decreases your ability to hold efforts in training. When you rest, the adaptations take place and you bounce back ready to go harder and stronger than before. Another benefit is that all that soreness from the great training you’re doing is going to decrease. You’re going to be more comfortable and that will translate to more productive workouts.

So, how do you incorporate rest into your training?


Professional triathlete Jesse Thomas shared some tips with Competitor Group:

Go way easier on your easy days.
Not every workout needs to be a personal best, your hard workouts should be HARD and your easy ones should be really, really, really easy. You’re training for a big effort on a single day, not a multi-day event like a cycling stage race.

Change the plan when your mind or body aren’t up to it.
If you have a long run or intense track session planned but the kids are sick, work went late and you skipped lunch, change the workout or push it to another day when the workout can be more productive for you.

Sleep More!
The single biggest difference between professional endurance athletes and amateurs is sleep. It’s hard to do; between family obligations, work, home maintenance and watching the Olympics every night, but if your motivation is dropping and the body is feeling sore, get some extra sleep. Even if it means skipping a workout here or there, remember the workouts are the stimulus for improvement, the actual improvement comes when we rest. Just a little bit adds up fast, one of my cycling friends once pointed out to me that just an extra 15 minutes of sleep a night is an extra hour and 45 minutes of sleep in a week.


When should you rest and how should you rest?




Blog post by Eric Wheeler.

About Eric Wheeler MSPT MPE CSCS

Eric joins the Cape Cod Rehab Running Team with an extensive list of athletic accomplishments including 2x Ironman finisher with a PR of 10:09:05. He earned a Boston Qualifying time for 2016 with a marathon PR of 3:06:27. A Physical Therapist and Certified Strength & Conditioning Specialist (CSCS), Eric enjoys helping injured runners get back on their feet.  It’s hard to believe Eric only started running in 2010 because everyone at Cape Cod Rehab was excited about the Falmouth Road Race! His motto: “Never judge your life because of one bad day. Judge it because of the BEST DAY.”

Monday, August 15, 2016

Cape Cod Rehab’s CCM Training Tip #6: Strength Train


What do most runners do to train?  Run.

The majority of distance runners started running because they love to run.  There are many health benefits to running and it is also convenient to just walk out the door and run.  Often overlooked or ignored by runners is the importance of strength training. Complimenting your running program with strength training will improve your performance and also reduce your risk for injury.  

Here is a TRX series of exercises that will help strengthen your total body with exercises specifically selected to address weaknesses typically seen in runners.  They will help strengthen the core, upper body and lower body and should be performed 2-3x per week, with a day of rest in between.

Note: Do not perform any exercise that causes or increases pain.


Warm Up


Squat/Row to Heel Raise
Hold the TRX handles with arms bent and your feet shoulder width apart. Sit back into a squat keeping your heels on the ground and extend arms. Stand back up pushing through your heels and pulling with your arms. Once fully standing raise up on to your toes. 
2x15

  

The Workout


Power Pull
Hold the TRX handle in single handle position with one hand.  Keep elbow bent at the start and feet shoulder width apart.  Extend arm holding handle and drop back into a squat.  Reach back with your other arm towards the ground.  Return to the start position by pulling with your arm and driving up with your legs. 
2x10 each arm


Alternating Side Lunge
Hold the TRX handles and stand with your feet together.  Take a large step out the side keeping toes pointed straight ahead. Bend the knee that you took a step with pushing hips back and sitting into a side lunge position. Return to the start position and step to the other side.
2x10


Balance Lunge with Knee Drive
Hold the TRX handles and stand with your feet together.  Step back into a reverse lunge.  For a challenge: keep the back foot off the floor in a balanced position!  Stand up on your stance leg driving your knee forward into a march position.  Do all repetitions on one side then the other.
2x10 each


Bridge with Hamstring Curl Series
Lay on the floor with your heels in the TRX cradles (handles should be about 12” off the ground). Raise your hips into a bridge position.  Keeping hips level draw one knee in towards your body.  Extend leg out and repeat with the other leg. Repeat with both legs. Lower body back to the floor.
2x10

 

Watch Meaghan demonstrate all the TRX Strength Training for Runners exercises...



Bonus! Runner’s TRX Core Circuit


Complete the three exercises in a row without rest.  Try the circuit 3 times.

Mountain Climbers
Start in a push up position with your feet in the straps.  Maintain a flat back as you march knees towards your chest in an alternating pattern.  As the knee comes in towards your body your hips should rise slightly. 
10x

Three Position Crunch
Start in a push up position with your feet in the straps.  Maintain a flat back as pull both your knees towards your chest. Return to the start position and pull both knees in towards your right elbow, return to the start position and pull both knees towards your left elbow. Repeat the series of 3 movements 5x.

Pike
Start in a push up position with your feet in the straps.  Keep your legs straight and drive your hips towards the ceiling as you pull your feet towards your hands. 
10x


Blog post by Eric Chandler.

About Eric Chandler

Eric joins the Cape Cod Rehab Running Team with a background in Exercise Science. He is a Certified Strength & Conditioning Specialist (CSCS), certified in Part I & Part II of the Burdenko Method, a Certified Functional Movement Screen (FMS) Specialist, and has also been training in the TRX Suspension Training Method. Eric looks for his clients’ strengths and uses those strengths to help them get the most out of each session. A recreational runner, Eric has served on many of the CCR Flyers Cape Cod Marathon relay teams as has a goal of breaking 20 minutes in the 5k.

Monday, August 8, 2016

Cape Cod Rehab’s CCM Training Tip #5: Form Running Drills


One way to improve your running speed and efficiency is by practicing form drills.  It is very common that your running form can break down with fatigue and any change in stride will increase your chance of injury.  Form running drills exaggerate different elements of the running stride to increase range of motion, build strength and develop muscle memory for important movement patterns. 

When should you perform form running drills?


Try adding the drills below into your training 2-3x per week. They should be done after your warm up/dynamic warm up and before your workout.

Note: Do not perform any exercise that causes or increases pain.

High Knees


High knees focuses on a powerful leg drive to develop strength in the quads and hip flexors.


How: Take short steps and alternate lifting your knees upward until your thigh is at least parallel to the ground. Foot strikes should be soft and near the balls of your feet.


Butt Kicks


Hello hamstrings! Butt kicks get the hamstring muscles firing and emphasize the recovery phase—also known as the follow through. Tight or weak hamstrings can lead to more of a shuffle stride with a low heel kick and shorter gait.


How: Alternate bringing your heels towards your glutes as you keep your thighs perpendicular to the ground.


High Skipping


Benefits are similar to the high knee drill but skipping also incorporates calf and hamstring power along with increased ankle stability.


How: When was the last time you skipped? Skip forward focusing on height and soft landings. As you drive up off the ground, lift your opposite arm overhead.


Quick Feet


Quick feet works on your cadence teaching your muscles to fire and turnover at a faster rate. Bonus! Quick feet is an excellent drill for over-striders.


How: Work on fast feet and fast arms as if you are running on hot coals. You should be running more on the balls of your feet and don’t worry about your high knees and butt kicks—just speed and quickness!


Backwards Running


Run backwards to recruit different muscles. It strengthens the quads while promoting good posture.


How: Just as it sounds—run backwards! Focus on standing up tall and take long strides landing on the balls of your feet.


Carioca


Running is almost performed exclusively in a straight line moving forward but it is very important to train laterally. The Carioca exercise (also known as the grapevine) works on hip mobility and lateral stability.


How: Cross one leg in front of the other, step out to the side, then cross your leg behind the other, step out to the side. Swing your arms side to side and your hips should be rotating as well. Start out slow and increase your speed as you get the hang of it. Don’t forget to repeat the exercises leading with the other leg!





Good luck out there!  Happy running!

Blog post by Jen Skiba

About Coach Jen Skiba

Jen began her running career as a middle-distance runner for Falmouth High School and has been involved with the sport for over 12 years as a runner, official, race management, and coach.  A Mashpee Fitness trainer and Certified Running Coach through the Road Runners Club of America (RRCA), Jen enjoys working with runners in the gym and on the roads. “Whether you are a beginner looking to get started running or at the intermediate level hoping to improve your times or tackle new distances, I can help you reach your goals!”

Monday, August 1, 2016

Cape Cod Rehab’s CCM Training Tip #4: Run Negative Splits


What are negative splits?


It’s pretty simple.  Negative splits are when you complete the second half of your run faster than your first!

Why should you run negative splits?


Every runner—whether you are a beginner or an experienced runner—should practice running negative splits on a weekly basis.  Practicing negative splits in your normal training runs will translate into racing negative splits.

Why does this matter?  Ok, here’s a common scenario.  You are at a road race.  The gun goes off.  All the excitement and the adrenaline at the start of the race leads to a super speedy first mile or two.  Even though you know it’s too fast, you feel good so you try to maintain the pace but totally bonk and have to practically shuffle your way to the finish line.  Has this ever happened to you?

In an ideal race situation, you start out at a comfortable pace.  In fact, you can use the first few miles of your run as a warm up—just don’t skip the pre-race dynamic warm up and form running drills!  By starting out slow you are conserving energy for the end of the race and hopefully avoid hitting that infamous wall everyone talks about.  After the first few miles, gradually increase your pace and finish strong, giving it all you got in the final miles.

You may think that starting out at a slower pace will effect your ability to run overall fast times but this is not true at all.  In fact, Runner’s World wrote at article a few years back about the last five men’s marathon world record runs.  Going out too fast and “time in the bank” rarely works out in favor of distance runners.  Spoiler alert!  3 of the last 5 were run at negative splits.  You can view the full article here: http://www.runnersworld.com/newswire/what-world-records-teach-about-marathon-pacing

Patience is a hard trait to teach.  There is such thing as starting out TOO slow and not being able to make up for the time but that’s why training runs are so important.  The more you practice running negative splits, the more comfortable and confident you will become with your own pacing strategies.  As always, you need to trust the process and work on your ability to hold back, build on your speed and cross that finish line with a new PR.

How can you practice running negative splits during your training?




Good luck out there!  Happy running!

Blog post by Jen Skiba.

About Coach Jen Skiba

Jen began her running career as a middle-distance runner for Falmouth High School and has been involved with the sport for over 12 years as a runner, official, race management, and coach.  A Mashpee Fitness trainer and Certified Running Coach through the Road Runners Club of America (RRCA), Jen enjoys working with runners in the gym and on the roads. “Whether you are a beginner looking to get started running or at the intermediate level hoping to improve your times or tackle new distances, I can help you reach your goals!”

Saturday, July 30, 2016

Use It or Lose It!


It is important to always keep up with the exercise that we do daily because taking a break from it for too long can have consequences. Our bodies need to move around and exercise whether it is a program that you are apart of or just a simple walk in the morning. It is certainly okay to have a day of rest or modify the exercise based on how you are feeling that particular day. However, stopping the exercise that your body is used to for more than two weeks can start to show changes in the muscles endurance that are being used. This is a term known as detraining and along with muscle atrophy can also show decreases in the 6 essential qualities of life and sport: balance, coordination, flexibility, endurance, speed and strength. 

Sometimes it is difficult to keep up with the exercise programs that we are in because we become busy, but even just getting out and moving makes a huge difference. There will still be a loss in the muscular endurance if the exercise intensity is decreased, but it will be substantially less endurance lost than just sitting around all day. Studies have shown that if the exercise intensity is decreased by 2/3 of the original training load then there will be losses in endurance. Even if a few weeks go by and you start to see your endurance being lost don't get discouraged but rather get back into whatever exercise you were doing before. The endurance that you worked so hard for will come back quickly so it’s always better to not hesitate and get right back to it. 

This graph below shows a one repetition maximum in kilograms taken before 20 weeks of training and one taken after 20 weeks of training. It then shows a 6 week period of no training after which another measurement was taken and finally after another 6 weeks of training another value was taken. This graph shows how even after losing the strength in the muscle after 6 weeks of not training it only took another few weeks to not only get back what was lost but improve on it. These measurements were taken by RS Staron in 1991 when he was doing a case study on the detraining and retraining of women.



So the point to take home here is to never give up on exercise even if a long break has been taken from it, there is always time to improve and create a healthy lifestyle.


Blog Post by Summer 2016 Intern Matt Leduc.